analytica 2022: New instruments for personalized medicine

  • 199 exhibitors from the fields of medicine, healthcare and laboratory diagnostics

  • Mass spectrometry and the like as tools of biomarker analytics

  • Themed day on personalized medicine on June 24, 2022

From cancer to birth defects to infectious disease: Modern gene and bioanalysis is the key to personalized medicine. Its goal it to increase the success rate of recovery and minimize side effects by examining the illness and the individual characteristics of a patient as precisely as possible. “analytica has been following advances in personalized medicine for years and will be focusing on this topic once again this year,” says Armin Wittmann, Exhibition Director at analytica, which will take place in Munich from June 21 to 24, 2022.


Among the nearly 900 exhibitors at the world’s leading trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and biotechnology, there are representatives from 199 companies from the fields of medicine, healthcare and laboratory diagnostics. There, companies, universities and research institutes will show their innovations for characterizing illnesses and therapies, as well as the metabolisms of patients on a molecular level. The spectrum ranges from kits for therapeutic drug monitoring, offered by analytica exhibitor Chromsystems, for example, to mass spectrometry systems for identifying sepsis pathogens and cancer biomarkers in Bruker’s portfolio.


Biomarkers: Essential for the medicine of tomorrow

Personalized medicine would not be possible without the analysis of proteins and other biomarkers that are specific to an illness and its development. Many analytica exhibitors, including industry giants like Merck, PerkinElmer, Promega, Sciex, Shimadzu, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waters and ZellBio, are offering systems that can detect biomarkers at extremely low concentrations in bodily fluids or tissue samples.


The science-focused analytica conference likewise addresses this topic. At a session on the first day of the conference, visitors can learn about liquid biopsies, which serve as a gentle alternative to aspiration biopsy as they can detect cancer biomarkers in bodily fluids like blood (June 21 from 12:30 to 14:30 in the ICM/Hall 4A). The analytica conference will also shed a light on the clinical relevance of mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and new imaging processes. In addition to cancer, the agenda will cover thyroid diseases, problems with lipometabolism and platelet disorders. Presentations on the handling of big data and the management of research data will also reflect the growing importance of digitalization for modern medicine. The full program of the analytica conference is at events.analytica-extended.de/en/conference/.


Themed day on personalized medicine on June 24 at analytica

All analytica visitors interested in the economic potential of tailored therapies should pencil in the analytica themed day on personalized medicine. It will take place on June 24 from 10:00 as part of the analytica Finance Days in the Biotech Forum in Hall A3. Under the title “Personalized medicine—digitalization and financing,” representatives from the life sciences industry, associations and clusters will discuss the current development as well as the future direction of personalized medicine. “We are bringing all the actors together in hope that this will bring individualized treatments into the everyday more quickly,” says Karin Hofelich, Life Sciences Publishing Manager at GoingPublic Media, and organizer of the themed day. In addition to examples of best practices, the themed day will also put a spotlight on preventative diagnostics. In a one-hour panel discussion industry experts will also debate on the topic of health data. The themed day will end with a presentation on the megatrend of artificial intelligence.


“With a combination of practice-oriented supporting program, scientific conference and international trade fair, analytica will give visitors a comprehensive understanding of the opportunities of personalized medicine,” says Armin Wittmann, adding: “The analytics and diagnostics industry is ready for greater individualization in medicine. Nowhere is this clearer than at analytica in Munich.”